Race interviews: Eduardo Prado

RSS
EMAIL
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
LINKEDIN

By Evelyn Spada

He is an internet phenomenon with only 17 years of age. With over 360,000 followers on Instagram, Eduardo Prado is today’s interviewee for Race’s blog. The former MasterChef Junior participant, an internationally recognized culinary program broadcast by Rede Bandeirantes de Televisão, began to cook at age of six and is now part of the new generation of digital influencers.

His Youtube channel, Eduardo Prado, with 134,000 subscribers, teaches several recipes and brings together different types of content, from basic photo editing classes to curiosities such as “what is umami“. The description of the channel explains Edu’s profile very well: “Extroverted, he likes to cook complex recipes, with many techniques and varied challenges”.

The language used in the posts and videos is direct and spontaneous, and the images and editions are very well produced. On Instagram, he talks about his daily life with great humor. It may seem like a virtual world, but his fame is much more real than you might think. Want some more? So just check the chat we had with this real web phenomeno.

To follow Edu Prado: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram 

Race: After your participation in MasterChef Junior, were you already thinking about becoming a digital influencer? How did it happen?

Eduardo Prado: I’ve always wanted to work with social media. As a child, I watched youtubers and could see that the influence they have can transform the world. I never planned to get where I am, but I believe that the constant effort to feed social medias and keep me active had an organic positive result. But it was an unimaginable growth.

Today I approach social media as a business, I have goals and planning for the growth of each channel, whether it is YouTube or Instagram. I plan campaigns as my own business. I have days for appointments, such as shooting videos, meeting partners for campaigns, planning strategies of disclosure in the press etc.

RC: How becoming a digital influencer has changed your routine?

EP: I am currently attending the last year of school, and in addition to the school madness, tests and the pressure to enter the desired college, I have a full agenda of being an influencer: attending events, posting photos every day, showing part of my life on Instagram stories, and when there is nothing interesting to show, I have to create something to keep my audience active, being, for example, a funny live stream. That is, my life that was already rushed became a marathon. But I won´t give it up because being an influencer is a business and, like every business, requires dedication and planning.

RC: Do you intend to pursue this career?

EP: Despite all the effort to maintain the networks, I really like what I do, and, at that moment, I would keep doing it. But in the future, I´d like to have an enterprise focused on the segment of ice cream, which is my great passion.

RC: How does the constant relationship with brands work?

EP: I am invited to events a lot and hired for campaigns on social media with sponsored posts and Instagram stories of brands that want to see their names linked to the profile of my followers. Nowadays, I have an agency that takes care of all the negotiation related to my image with brands and the press, VeCComm Digital Agency. And it was also necessary to invest in a structure so that I could have quality videos. When we reach a high number of followers, the demands increase and then we need partners to offer a more professional relationship and content, which also gives me some free time and helps me having more time for other campaigns.

RC: What are the main challenges faced as a professional in this segment? 

EP: The main challenge is, without a doubt, time and the stress that the lack of time causes. Therefore, I always try to have some weekly leisure time to relax and not think or do anything.

RC: What does it mean for you to be an influencer?

EP: For me, an influencer is more than a person with followers, it is someone who has a platform for transformation, who can, as the name implies, influence people in what comes to their choices and convictions. And that’s a big responsibility. On the other side of the cell phone screen there are people, human beings. RC: How can brands improve their relationships with influencers? EP: I believe that in order to improve the relationship between brands and influencers, it is necessary to mature the market, since it is a very new segment. And both parts need to mature, as much the way brands value the influencer as the way they perform, that is, the influencer must comply with everything in the contract (always have a contract, by the way!), be responsible with deadlines and with what was accorded. At the end of a job, show the result, have a report. One must create a professional relationship.And, if possible, deliver more than was accorded. This can be a strategy to win the brand and then both sides win! RC: What do you take into account when choosing partnerships with companies? EP: When I receive a proposal, my first question is: “Is it part of the message that I want to pass on to my followers?”, If so, I will do everything to get the job. If not, I will ask the following question: “Will this campaign jeopardize that message?” Not being harmful and having a connection with me is step one for me to think about the possibility of forming a partnership. RC: How to measure the success of a campaign? EP: More than the numbers, for me, the success of a campaign depends on the repercussion it has among followers, that is, how the action is received and commented among the audience, what engagement it had as result.

RSS
EMAIL
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
LINKEDIN